BACKPACK ID

Bridging languages and memories to foster multiple identities: "Never leave your backpack behind!"

About the project

BACKPACK ID is an innovative intervention for promoting the inclusion of refugee children at school in 4 European countries (Greece and Italy, Germany and Sweden), which are met with acute and very diverse challenges by the ongoing refugee crisis. Informed by these differences, the present approach on social inclusion advances a common account of social inclusion challenges; it sees the social inclusion of refugee children as a function of addressing the needs and perspectives of those children and their families, and local communities and stakeholders, while affirming common European values.

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Outputs

Backpack ID using a bottom-up participatory method produced the following outputs in order to address social inclusion interpersonal and intergroup understanding in the school environment.

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Partners

Who we are

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My name is Antonis. Every summer I go to my nan in Thessaloniki, Greece and to my poppy in Kalamata.

But now about me. I dance very well and really enjoy it. I enjoy playing with DeAgostini figurines and play the guitar, what’s more I DO NOT like maths.

I am 9 years old. My whole life I have lived in Berlin, even in the same flat. Because of that, there haven’t been major changes in my life. This is not the case for my mum and dad. Both my parents came here from Greece. My mum moved to Berlin in 1998 that is 20 years ago. She wanted to live in another country apart from Greece and because she was able to speak German, she chose Berlin to study. When she arrived at the airport she thought to herself “Oh dear, what have I done?” It wasn’t easy at the beginning but then it started to be fun. The thing she liked the best was to meet people from all continents of the world. She says, “Berlin is my home but Greece is my home country.”

My dad came to Berlin in 2000. He had studied in England. When he arrived he thought it was strange in a beautiful way. He was happy to meet a fellow student from Greece and that he found a job quickly, even though he was unable to speak German. He says, “Berlin is fun.”

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